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Monday, 13 January 2014

Wheelchair-Bound Sailor's blames radiation exposure at Fukushima, Department of Defense says no


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WASHINGTON (WUSA9) -- He served his country, but has his country turned it's back on him? A Maryland sailor says he's now wheelchair-bound, and he blames it on radiation he was exposed to while representing his country at what's been called the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. 
Steve Simmons spoke to WUSA9's Debra


Alfarone exclusively. 
Simmons never needed any help getting out on the golf course, "Even if it is a bad shot, I'm still happy." 
Golf, hiking, he's always been the guy that never stops, "I love P90X, in fact after I did P90X, I also ordered the insanity workout."
Until November 2011. 
Steve was 33. That's when life started changing for this U.S. Naval Administrative Officer. It was eight months after Simmons served on the USS Ronald Reagan when it was the first ship to respond to what's been called the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl - the March 2011 meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. It was the result of being slammed by a powerful tsunami, triggered by the most violent earthquake Japan had ever seen.  Steve started feeling tired, not himself. Then, he blacked out while driving to work, and drove his truck up on a curb. Steve said his list of ailments was puzzling, "You're starting to run fevers, your lymph nodes start swelling, you're having night sweats, you're getting spastic and you're losing sensation in your legs, and you can't feel your legs when you're getting 2nd degree burns on them, and how do you explain those things?"
Doctors could not. Steve's leg muscles eventually just gave up, and he's now confined to a wheelchair to get around. 

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